pink apple juice

Untitled//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.jsIt’s juicing time of year again, and this year the apple juice is pink Untitled//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

This is because we have had our first harvest of the variety ‘redlove’.  It make for  good garden apple tree as the leaves are dark the flowers dark pink and the fruit dark red. As a juicing apple it is interesting as the flesh and juice are also red, and only a little added to the press makes the juice a beautiful shade of pink.


As usual, we pre froze the apples, and in this picture this is how they look once defrosted – a little sad, but it does help with the juicing, you can practically squeeze them by hand after a brief freeze.  The other variety of apple we use is an unknown apple that the previous owner grew from a pip. We call this variety ‘bejeezus’, as we have found it is not particularly good for eating or cooking, but ideal for juicing resulting in juice sweet enough to drink without added sugar, that is also good for making wine and cider with too.  This year we shall probably have it as juice, as the cider stocks are still high.  Why we call it ‘bejeezus’? because once we realised we were going to freeze and press these apples, less care is needed when picking, and our method is to hook the shepherd’s crook around branches and shake the bejeezus  out of the tree, resulting in apples raining down hard, (and sometimes painfully) – making a fast harvesting process.  Mr CIG was a little surprised the first time I did this, and hadn’t shared my plan with him, but  he ducked fast…



raspberry cordial


raspberry cordial

400g raspberries (fresh or frozen)
400g sugar
300 ml water
30ml/ 2 tbsp lemon juice

Put all the ingredients in a pan and bring to a gentle simmer. Cook like this for 5 or 10 minutes, until the fruit has broken down. Strain and bottle in a sterilised bottle. Makes about 3/4 of a litre.

Keep in the fridge and use within a couple of weeks. Dilute to taste, with water, fizzy water, sparkling wine, or cider.

soft fruit

18958845944_b5d9189a4f_oWe have been picking soft fruit for some weeks. here at Colour it Green towers.  We have raspberries, blackcurrants, loganberries, wild strawberries, blueberries and raspberries.

I realise I have listed raspberries twice, but there are so many of them, they deserved a second mention.  Our raspberry bed is a jungle. I haven’t been in and pruned out the old wood, the paths are lost to junior raspberry canes taking over triffid style, and the bed also seems to have willow, buddleia and bramble and bindweed, which we attempt to remove once we have climbed in for picking.  Still we are picking about a kilo of raspberries a day, we still have some of last year’s in the freezer, and for reasons that seemed logical at the time, last winter also established a bed of yellow autumn fruiting raspberries … Suffice to say, we need more ways to use raspberries. loganberry pavlova and a sunset

Firm favourites are raspberry crumble, jam, smoothies, in rumptopf, pavlova ice-cream, and eton mess (made with easy microwave meringues),  and raspberry flapjacks

I have a few recipes I haven’t shared yet and so will set about setting that right over the next few weeks, as well as trying some new ones.

Raspberry recipes very welcome.

UntitledA family trip out to visit the tiny 13 Century church perched on Brentor. Sort of Devon’s answer to Glastonbury Tor, this is visible for miles around, but the church is still complete, and views are not of levels, but open moors and Plymouth sound – and impressive views they are too. Untitled

It’s only a short (steep) climb to the church, so we also popped along to nearby Wheal Betsy, the remains of the engine house to a mine.
UntitledLooking up the leaning tower is a guaranteed way to vertigo! It is well worth the climb down to the ruins, and a perfect picnic spot Untitled

elderflower turkish delight
Just when you think you have tried all the good elderflower recipes – we have elderflower champagne, elderflower cordial and elderflower  fritters here every year, along comes another one. And it’s a winner: elderflower delight.

I’ve made Turkish delight before, but without success, either it didn’t set, or set into hard rubber.  But this one is just right, and I shall use it as the base for other flavours… but when elderflowers are in season, and you have an abundance of champagne, eaten more fritters than you ought to, and have a year’s supply of cordial,  what can you do.  The recipe is from the river cottage hedgerow handbook, and they have helpfully put it on their website too

in all the commotion, and yes there was a fair bit going on, I forgot to tell of new arrivals:

sheep and lambs
New sheep, this ewe (Geraldine) only has one side of her udder working, so no good for breeding from, but we don’t intend to so that’s ok, she comes with her twins – the girl lamb (Gilly) got the good side but the boy (Godfrey) was bottle fed – he’s eating grass now, and will soon catch up in size with his sister. They are all poll Dorset, but clearly not all that pure, as Gilly has black around her eyes, the tips of her ears, hooves and scattered through her wool – as we like naturally coloured wool, we will be interested in seeing how her fleece turns out.
fiesty and chicks
In addition to the ewe and lambs we also have had chicks.. lots and lots of them – too many really… and the latest lot (fourth hatch of the year) were hatched under our new broody – given to me by the lovely Sandra from Bellecross hens – and this hen is mean when broody.. but a good trait in a mother I think, as she is very protective her her charges

It’s all go in other areas too, in the veg garden and house renovations, and getting out and about too. The flower garden has to manage itself – I’m all about the cottage garden
home sweet home


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 97 other followers